A thoughtful and reflective discussion on postpartum training

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After giving birth, many new moms feel overwhelmed and exhausted. Others are itching to get back to exercising regularly, especially if they were active before and during pregnancy.

Of course, many experience all of these emotions (and more) at once. No matter what you’re feeling, having a postpartum workout plan may help you feel better physically and emotionally.

When to Start Postpartum Workouts

It is important to consult your healthcare provider for medical clearance before exercise, especially if you had a c-section or experienced a complication during pregnancy or birth. Women who have had normal vaginal deliveries should usually be able to begin light exercise, such as walking, a few days after delivery. Only do this if you feel ready, though.

Best Postpartum Exercises

You’ll want to do basic exercises that strengthen major muscle groups. Start with 10 to 20 minutes a day, and work up to 30 or more minutes of moderate-intensity exercise.

If you performed vigorous-intensity exercise before pregnancy, you can return to that after birth, as long as you do so gradually and with guidance from your provider.

Neck Stretches

Breastfeeding and baby holding can really make your neck stiff. Be sure to relax your neck a few times each day. Gently drop your neck forward and let the weight of your head pull your neck and stretch it, holding for 5 to 10 seconds. Lift your head and drop your right ear to your right shoulder, again taking care to be gentle in your movements.

Let it rest there for 5 to 10 seconds. Repeat on the left side. Once again returning to center, carefully relax your head backward, gazing upward and holding for 5 to 10 seconds.

Safe postpartum exercise is incredibly valuable for your mental and physical health as you recover from pregnancy and birth. Take some time to get to know and appreciate your postpartum body.

Your breathing is likely to feel different for the first few days after giving birth as your organs return to their former positions. Deep breathing can help in your physical and emotional recovery from childbirth.

Place your hands low on your abdomen and practice slowly breathing in until you can feel your hands move. Then, slowly exhale. Repeat 5 to 8 times.

When to Start Postpartum Workouts

It is important to consult your healthcare provider for medical clearance before exercise, especially if you had a c-section or experienced a complication during pregnancy or birth. It’s common for doctors to clear women for normal pre-pregnancy activities, including exercise, at the six-week postpartum check-up. If you want to intensify your workouts prior to this check-up, talk to your doctor first. Remember to also drink water to thirst. Also be sure to consume plenty of healthy snacks, especially if you’re nursing (which requires additional calories).

I think one of the biggest mistakes I see most people make with their pull-up/chin-up programming is that they simply don’t train the pattern enough. However, this approach only works well for those who can already perform 3-5 pull-ups and are looking to level up that number. If you can’t even perform one this would be a daunting prospect to say the least.

That said, I think staying cognizant of total VOLUME is an often overlooked component of pull-up progress. Moreover, you also have the option of purchasing both the Ultimate Pull-Up Program & the Ultimate Push-Up Program at a heavily discounted price.

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